Mega Millions is played in 44 states — but not Alabama, Alaska, Hawaii, Mississippi, Nevada and Utah — the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The most recent Mega Millions grand prize, a $142 million jackpot, was won May 4 in the Dayton, Ohio, suburb of Moraine; the winner claimed the prize anonymously through a trust, netting a $60.5 million lump sum after taxes. 
The winner, who has not yet claimed the prize, has 365 days from the draw date to turn in the ticket at one of nine California Lottery District Office locations. The lucky person has two options for payment: A payment plan for about $543 million (before federal taxes) paid out over 29 years or a lump cash sum of $320.5 million (before federal taxes). 

Include all your natural children, children of your other spouse, legally adopted children and stepchildren who are unmarried under the age of 21 years on the date of your application. You need to includes these children even if you are no longer married to the child's parent, even if the child does not reside with you and/or will not immigrate with you.
In 2013, US Powerball announced that it had a goal: to reach a $1 billion jackpot by 2022. The lottery has since passed the half a billion mark on four different occasions, and fans and players eagerly anticipated the grand rollover that would knock the others out of the top spots. As luck would have it, they only had to wait three years, not nine, to see their billion-dollar dreams come true. On 13 January 2016, the world's three luckiest ticket holders -- in Tennessee, California, and Florida -- shared the biggest jackpot ever in lottery history: $1.58 billion!
Wednesday’s jackpot might have been the second-biggest, but many expected it to actually surpass that $1.6 billion record if that lucky Massachusetts ticket-holder hadn’t hit on the right numbers. That’s because of what Kelly Tabor, a spokeswoman for the Colorado Lottery, calls “jackpot chasers,” casual players who rush out to buy a ticket when the jackpot gets big enough.
Elecia Battle made national headlines in January 2004 when she claimed that she had lost the winning ticket in the December 30, 2003 Mega Millions drawing.[43] She then filed a lawsuit against the woman who had come forward with the ticket, Rebecca Jemison. Several days later, when confronted with contradictory evidence, she admitted that she had lied.[44] Battle was charged with filing a false police report the following day. As a result of this false report, she was fined $1,000, ordered to perform 50 hours of community service, and required to compensate the police and courts for various costs incurred.[45]
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