MUSL officials initially suspected fraud or a reporting error. However, all 110 winners had played numbers from fortune cookies made by Wonton Food Inc. of Long Island City, New York. The factory had printed the numbers "22, 28, 32, 33, 39, 40" on thousands of fortunes. The "40" in the fortune did not match the Powerball number, 42. None of the employees of Wonton Food played those numbers; at the time, the closest game member was Connecticut.[40] Since the ticket holders had won as result of a coincidence rather than foul play, the payouts were made.[41]
In March 2009, it was reported that New Jersey, already a Mega Millions member, sought permission to join Powerball. Shortly after, discussions were revealed about allowing each US lottery to offer both games. On Oct 13, the Mega Millions consortium and MUSL reached an agreement in principle to cross-sell Mega Millions and Powerball.[9] In Nov, MUSL signed an agreement to start streaming Powerball drawings online.[10][11]

Every effort has been made to ensure that the winning numbers posted on this website are accurate; however, no valid claim may be based on information contained herein. In the event of a discrepancy between the numbers posted on this website and the official winning numbers, the official winning numbers as certified by the Multi-State Lottery Association and/or the NCEL shall control. All materials on this Website are owned by or licensed to the NCEL. Materials on this Website may not be modified in any way or reproduced or publicly displayed, performed or distributed or otherwise used for any public or commercial purpose without the express written consent of the NCEL. Copyright © 2006-2018. The North Carolina Education Lottery. All rights reserved.
×