Based on statistical projections, the average jackpot win increased from $95 million to $141 million. Over 3.5 million additional prizes were expected to be won yearly due to the change in probability. The starting jackpot increased to $20 million, with minimum rollovers of $5 million. The jackpot contribution increased from 30.3% to 32.5% of total sales. The Power Play option was modified; second prize, usually $200,000, was given an automatic 5x multiplier, making the 5+0 prize $1 million cash. The bonus second prize if the jackpot exceeded its previous record by $25 million, triggered only twice, was eliminated with the 2012 format change.
^ Jump up to: a b Prizes are uniform in all Mega Millions jurisdictions, with the exception of California (where all prizes, including the jackpot, are pari-mutuel; payouts are based on sales and the number of winners of each prize tier.) All other Mega Millions members' second through ninth prizes are set amounts, although in rare cases they can be reduced.
On January 13th, 2016 the American multi-state lottery Powerball set the world-record for the biggest jackpot of all time at USD$1.6 billion when it was won by John and Lisa Robinson of Tennessee, Maureen Smith and David Kaltschmidt of Florida and Marvin and Mae Acosta of California. It was the first time in history a prize had topped the billion dollar mark!
Even though some scratch cards costing as much as $50 in Texas and $30 in Massachusetts, state lotteries are exempt from Federal Trade Commission “truth in advertising laws” The Federal Communications Commission prohibits the broadcast of lottery advertisements, but has exemptions for lotteries “conducted by a state acting under the authority of state law. Hence, TV commercials like “The Possibilities are Endless.” (Lotteries raise over $70 billion a year, according to the North American Association of State and Provincial Lotteries. Profits from the Powerball are used to fund public projects approved by state legislatures.)
Mega Millions is notorious for paying out enormous sums to its winners, including 10 jackpots of more than $300,000,000 since it started.  It’s simple to play – pick five different numbers, ranging from 1 to 70, then your Mega Ball (any number from 1-25). Like every other lottery, your win will depend on how many numbers match up with the numbers drawn.
Lottery jackpots are overwhelming played by low-income Americans, studies show. In fact, the lottery jackpot only becomes “progressive” — meaning that high earners spend more on tickets than more than low earners — when the jackpot is at least $806 million or more, according to this study by Emily Oster, currently a professor of economics at Brown University.

Mega Millions (which began as The Big Game in 1996 and renamed, temporarily, to The Big Game Mega Millions six years later) is an American multi-jurisdictional lottery game; it is offered in 44 states, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The first (The Big Game) Mega Millions drawing was in 2002; see below. (What is now Mega Millions initially was offered in six states; the logo for all versions of the game following the retiring of The Big Game name featured a gold-colored ball with six stars to represent the game's initial membership.)
Every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of all information contained on this site. This site, however, is not the final authority on games, winning numbers, or other information. All winning tickets must be validated by the NMLA before prizes will be paid. You must be 18 years of age or older to play the lottery. Our site is constantly updated with new information. Please check back often.
When the Powerball jackpot is won, the next jackpot is guaranteed to be $40 million (annuity). If a jackpot is not won, the minimum rollover is $10 million. The cash in the jackpot pool is guaranteed to be the current value of the annuity. If revenue from ticket sales falls below expectations, game members must contribute additional funds to the jackpot pool to cover the shortage; the most likely scenario where this can occur is if the jackpot is won in consecutive drawings.

To play Lotto America, pick five main numbers between 1 and 52 and one Star Ball from a separate pool of 1 to 10. You can choose your own numbers or ask for a Quick Pick. It costs $1 per line to play, while you can also add the All Star Bonus to your ticket for a small additional fee for the chance to increase any non-jackpot prize. Find out more about how to play Lotto America, and then just pick up a playslip from any participating retailer to take part.
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Powerball offers an optional multiplier known as the Power Play, which multiplies the seven bottom prize divisions by 2, 3, 4, 5 or 10 times, depending on the draw and jackpot size. Matching five main numbers and the Power Play still makes you a multi-millionaire by doubling Powerball’s second place prize to a staggering $2,000,000! To add the multiplier, simply check the Power Play box when you buy your Powerball tickets online.
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I am truly grateful to the team at USAGCL for all their help and assistance in guiding me through the process of my green card lottery entry. I work in the film industry in Australia and it's always been a dream to move to LA and work in Hollywood. Thanks to USAGCL my dream is not far from fruition. I entered the lottery in 2013 and I won in my first year! I couldn't believe it, especially as I had heard so many stories of people failing again and again year in and year out. When I had trouble filling out my application a consultant called me from their offices in the States and walked me through the whole process. He provided me with all the information I needed and his contact details for any further enquiries. He really went above and beyond to make it clear and easy for me. So Tinseltown here I come!
The US Powerball game, arguably one of the most popular and widely-played games in the United States, is a shared jackpot game which is co-ordinated by an NPO formed by an agreement between the various state lotteries. The US Powerball game has become renowned for its impressive $40 million starting jackpot, with the potential of yielding nine-figure jackpot wins.
The advertised estimated jackpot represents the total payments that would be paid to jackpot winner(s) should they accept the annuity option. This estimate is based on the funds accumulated in the jackpot pool rolled over from prior drawings, expected sales for the next drawing, and market interest rates for the securities that would be used to fund the annuity.[2] The estimated jackpot usually is 32.5% of the (non-Power Play) revenue of each base ($1) play, submitted by game members to accumulate into a prize pool to fund the jackpot. If the jackpot is not won in a particular drawing, the prize pool carries over to the next drawing, accumulating until there is a jackpot winner. This prize pool is the cash that is paid to a jackpot winner if they choose cash. If the winner chooses the annuity, current market rates are used to calculate the graduated payment schedule and the initial installment is paid. The remaining funds in the prize pool are invested to generate the income required to fund the remaining installments. If there are multiple jackpot winners for a drawing, the jackpot prize pool is divided equally for all such plays.
Before the agreement, the only places that sold both Mega Millions and Powerball tickets were retailers straddling a border; one retailer on the Sharon, Pennsylvania/Masury, Ohio border sold both Mega Millions (via the Ohio Lottery) and Powerball (Pennsylvania) before the agreement and continued to be the only retailer to sell tickets for both lotteries.[12]
Mega Millions is played in 44 states — but not Alabama, Alaska, Hawaii, Mississippi, Nevada and Utah — the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The most recent Mega Millions grand prize, a $142 million jackpot, was won May 4 in the Dayton, Ohio, suburb of Moraine; the winner claimed the prize anonymously through a trust, netting a $60.5 million lump sum after taxes. 
In 2013, US Powerball announced that it had a goal: to reach a $1 billion jackpot by 2022. The lottery has since passed the half a billion mark on four different occasions, and fans and players eagerly anticipated the grand rollover that would knock the others out of the top spots. As luck would have it, they only had to wait three years, not nine, to see their billion-dollar dreams come true. On 13 January 2016, the world's three luckiest ticket holders -- in Tennessee, California, and Florida -- shared the biggest jackpot ever in lottery history: $1.58 billion!

*The 45 lotteries offering the new game are: the Arizona Lottery, Arkansans Lottery, Colorado Lottery, Connecticut Lottery Corporation, D.C. Lottery (District of Columbia), Delaware Lottery, Florida Lottery, Georgia Lottery, Idaho Lottery, Hoosier Lottery (Indiana), Iowa Lottery, Illinois Lottery, Kansas Lottery, Kentucky Lottery Corporation, Louisiana Lottery Corporation, Maine Lottery, Maryland Lottery, Minnesota State Lottery, Missouri Lottery, Montana Lottery, Michigan Lottery, Nebraska Lottery, New Hampshire Lottery Commission, New Jersey Lottery, New Mexico Lottery, New York Lottery, North Carolina Education Lottery, North Dakota Lottery, Ohio Lottery, Oklahoma Lottery, Oregon Lottery, Pennsylvania Lottery, Rhode Island Lottery, South Carolina Education Lottery, South Dakota Lottery, Tennessee Education Lottery, Texas Lottery, Virgin Islands Lottery, Vermont Lottery, Virginia Lottery, Wisconsin Lottery, West Virginia Lottery, Washington Lottery, California Lottery.
In the United States, lotteries are run by 47 jurisdictions: 44 states plus the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Lotteries are subject to the laws of and operated independently by each jurisdiction, and there is no national lottery organization. However, consortiums of state lotteries jointly organize games spanning larger geographical footprints, which in turn, carry larger jackpots. Two major lottery games, Mega Millions and Powerball, are both offered in nearly all jurisdictions that operate lotteries, and serve as de facto national lotteries.
Earlier big Mega Millions winners at theLotter included Spanish player B.G. who won a $250,000 second place prize in the Mega Millions draw on 20 March 2012. A year earlier, N.B. traveled from his home in Switzerland to New York to collect his $250,000 Mega Millions prize after winning in the draw on 26 April 2011. And T.K. from New York was our first huge Mega Millions winner when he won $250,000 in October 2009. Will you be theLotter’s next big Mega Millions winner? Play online today and find out!
It is still pretty tough to win the Jackpot, which is one of the reasons it is known as one of the biggest jackpot games in the world today – the odds of claiming a single-ticket win of both the five numbers plus the red Powerball, currently stand at about 1 in 24.87. The game definitely has the ability to make you fabulously wealthy beyond your wildest dreams or imagination. The Powerball lottery has the honour of having the highest jackpot prize in the world ever won by a single ticket - it is also the lottery that has paid out the highest jackpot to just one person. The biggest jackpot ever won on the US Powerball was a staggering $590.5 million, won by one lucky ticket holder in May 2013. The second-biggest jackpot snatched up, was an amazing $580 million which was won by two ticket holders in November 2012.
EuroMillions currently has a minimum jackpot of approximately €15 million and a maximum jackpot capped at €190 million, making EuroMillions by far the largest lottery prize in Europe. EuroMillions also has annual Superdraws several times a year, automatically boosting the jackpot to €100 million. To read more about these special jackpots, and for news on upcoming draws, see our EuroMillions Superdraw page!
Most stock quote data provided by BATS. Market indices are shown in real time, except for the DJIA, which is delayed by two minutes. All times are ET. Disclaimer. Morningstar: © 2018 Morningstar, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Factset: FactSet Research Systems Inc.2018. All rights reserved. Chicago Mercantile Association: Certain market data is the property of Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc. and its licensors. All rights reserved. Dow Jones: The Dow Jones branded indices are proprietary to and are calculated, distributed and marketed by DJI Opco, a subsidiary of S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC and have been licensed for use to S&P Opco, LLC and CNN. Standard & Poor's and S&P are registered trademarks of Standard & Poor's Financial Services LLC and Dow Jones is a registered trademark of Dow Jones Trademark Holdings LLC. All content of the Dow Jones branded indices © S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC 2018 and/or its affiliates.
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