Once your ticket is purchased, scanned and uploaded into your account that ticket is yours. Legally and in every other sense possible. The same questions always pop up at this stage of the explanation to new time online lottery players and these doubts can be best explained in further detail in the article on the Iraqi Lottery winner but the gist of it is as follows: 
In the aftermath of the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, the legislature in Albany, fearing a monumental loss of revenue, passed legislation the following month, which was signed by Governor George Pataki, which included joining a multi-jurisdictional lottery game. Around the same time, for entirely different reasons, Ohio's governor also gave the green light to joining a multi-jurisdictional game. Both lotteries opted to join The Big Game, which, at the time, was offered in seven states. The added populations of the two new jurisdictions, in turn, led to a larger double matrix. The first machine continued to hold white 52 balls, while 16 gold balls were added in the second, meaning there were 52 numbers to pick from in both parts of each $1 game. On May 15, 2002, the game was renamed The Big Game Mega Millions; shortly after, it became just Mega Millions. Except for the 2010 cross-selling expansion, this was the only time The Big Game or Mega Millions simultaneously added more than one member.
73-year-old H from El Salvador had one question on his mind when the Powerball jackpot hit $1.5 billion: Where can I buy a Powerball ticket? Luckily the answer was theLotter and he won the $1 million 2nd prize in the historic draw on 13 January 2016! "I won!" he shouted out when he heard the news. He plans to travel and retire in style. Read his story here.
Once your lottery ticket is purchased, scanned and uploaded to your account, you own the ticket and the rights of the ticket – legally speaking what the agent has after scanning in your ticket is just a piece a paper. (This is why you should never trust a website that claims it is legitimate and does not following the insurance model but does not scan the tickets and send them to you – red flag).
Two identical machines are used for each drawing, randomly selected from four sets. The model of machine used is the Halogen, manufactured by Smartplay International of Edgewater Park, New Jersey. There are eight ball sets (four of each color); one set of each color is randomly selected before a drawing. The balls are mixed by a turntable at the bottom of the machine that propels the balls around the chamber. When the machine selects a ball, the turntable slows to catch it, sends it up the shaft, and then down the rail to the display.
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From purchase to payoff, theLotter is secure and simple. Per our Terms of Use, theLotter has no legal claim to your tickets whatsoever -- all winnings are 100% yours. When you buy Powerball tickets online, a confirmation email is sent to you as proof of ticket ownership. After the ticket is physically purchased, you will also be able to see a scanned copy of the ticket in your account as proof-of-purchase. Since our founding in 2002, theLotter has had the privilege of paying out more than $90 million to over 4 million winners.
Yes! Mega Millions lottery tickets are offered for sale in 46 US states and territories. When you play Mega Millions online with theLotter from anywhere in the world, an official lottery ticket is bought locally on your behalf. A scan of your Mega Millions ticket will be available as part of theLotter’s See Your Ticket Service in time for the Tuesday or Friday night draw.
Every jurisdiction has its own law on winners remaining anonymous. Some jurisdictions are required by law to provide the winner's name, city of residence, game won and prize amount to any third party that requests the information. Other jurisdictions allow winners to create trusts to shield their names from the public, or otherwise claim prizes anonymously. Check with your lottery to see if taking a photo of the winner is required and what its rules are on prize claims. Even if you keep your identity secret from the media and the public, you will have to be known to the lottery so officials can confirm you are eligible to play and win, as well as other legal requirements.
Yes! Powerball tickets are available to buy in 47 US states and territories and theLotter’s service makes tickets available worldwide. theLotter local offices buy official US Powerball lottery tickets on your behalf from inside the US, and with theLotter’s See Your Ticket Service, you will see a scan of any and all Powerball tickets you buy in your theLotter account before the relevant draw.
On October 13, 2009, the Mega Millions consortium and Multi-State Lottery Association (MUSL) reached an agreement in principle to cross-sell Mega Millions and Powerball in American lottery jurisdictions, with the two groups referred to as the "Mega Power Lottery"[7] by many users. The expansion occurred on January 31, 2010, as 23 Powerball members began selling Mega Millions tickets for their first drawing on February 2, 2010; likewise, 10 Mega Millions members began selling Powerball tickets for their first drawing the next day. Montana (joining Mega Millions on March 1, 2010) was the first jurisdiction to add either game after the cross-sell expansion. Nebraska (March 20, 2010), Oregon (March 28, 2010), Arizona (April 18, 2010), Maine (May 9, 2010), Colorado and South Dakota (the latter two on May 16, 2010) also have joined Mega Millions since the expansion.
This method specifically has faced criticism recently from a number of lottery organizers such as Camelot, the UK National Lottery organizers who are not happy with companies “selling tickets” (selling bets on outcomes of their established lottery draws) for prices sometimes even cheaper than Camelot themselves sells their tickets. This legal and corporate dispute looks set to continue for the foreseeable future, in the mean time you can continue to buy Powerball tickets online, only now you are aware of the key differences between the two business models. 
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