When it was launched in 1992 Powerball became the first game to use two drums. Using two drums to draw numbers from offers more manipulation by simultaneously allowing high jackpot odds, numerous prize levels and low overall odds of winning (as explained later, a ticket can win by matching only one number). The two-drum concept was suggested by Steve Caputo of the Oregon Lottery. The two-drum concept has since been used by The Big Game (now Mega Millions) in the US, Australia's Powerball, Thunderball in the UK, Eurojackpot and EuroMillions (unlike most two-drum games, Euromillions selects two numbers called "Lucky Stars" from the 2nd drum; jackpot winners must make a total of seven matches).[citation needed]


The Powerball jackpot was last won on 11 August 2018 when a single ticket purchased in Staten Island, New York, matched the winning numbers to claim the entire $245,600,000 ($147,844,558.62 cash) prize. The winner of the jackpot was identified as Nandlall Mangal, a 42-year-old Guyanese immigrant in the US who vowed to continue working even after the amazing Powerball win.
On June 2, 2010, Ohio won a Powerball jackpot; it became the first lottery selling either Mega Millions or Powerball (when 2010 began) to provide a jackpot-winning ticket for its newer game. The ticket was worth a $261 million annuity; it was sold in Sunbury. Ohio's second Powerball jackpot-winning ticket, sold for the June 23, 2010 drawing, was part of another first; since Montana also provided a jackpot winner for that drawing, it was the first time a jackpot was shared through lotteries which sold competing games before the cross-selling expansion, as Montana sold only Powerball before the expansion date.
The other option is to buy single tickets and play alone. Pick your own numbers, play your own tickets and if you win, you win it all! In this scenario, it is advisable to buy lottery tickets online at least 24 hours before the draw will take place. The reason behind this is because in the single ticket scenario, you want to leave enough time for the agents to go to their local store, purchase your ticket, scan your ticket and upload your ticket into your account. If you purchase your Powerball tickets online at the last minute, some online lottery ticket providers will process your payment and if they can’t buy a ticket in time for the draw you wanted, your ticket will be purchased for the following draw. Bear in mind that the nature of a global online lottery with agents scattered around the world is that everyone is working on different time zones. To be sure that your ticket is purchased for the lottery draw you want, ensure that you don’t buy your lottery tickets online at the last minute. This is something that all online lottery players should be aware of as jackpots and odds can change from draw to draw. You need to know that if you are buying Powerball tickets online, which draw your tickets will be entered into.
On top of the cost of a regular ticket, you can pay extra for the Power Play option which acts as a multiplier of prizes in a similar way to how Mega Millions’ Megaplier does. Taking the Power Play option multiplies winnings earned by matching just one number right through to matching five numbers - turning the $1,000,000 prize into a $2,000,000 prize.

Power Play, when it began in 2001, was drawn with a special wheel. In 2006 and 2007, MUSL replaced one of the 5× spaces on the Power Play wheel with a 10×. During each month-long promotion, MUSL guaranteed that there would be at least one drawing with a 10× multiplier. The promotion returned in 2008; the ball landed in the 10× space twice. After being absent in 2009, the 10× multiplier returned in May 2010 (after the Power Play drawing was changed to RNG.) The promotion was extended for the only time, as the 10× multiplier was not drawn until June 12. The second prize 5× guarantee continued; the 10× applied to all non-jackpot prizes, as in previous promotions.


In 2013, US Powerball announced that it had a goal: to reach a $1 billion jackpot by 2022. The lottery has since passed the half a billion mark on four different occasions, and fans and players eagerly anticipated the grand rollover that would knock the others out of the top spots. As luck would have it, they only had to wait three years, not nine, to see their billion-dollar dreams come true. On 13 January 2016, the world's three luckiest ticket holders -- in Tennessee, California, and Florida -- shared the biggest jackpot ever in lottery history: $1.58 billion!
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Yes! Powerball tickets are available to buy in 47 US states and territories and theLotter’s service makes tickets available worldwide. theLotter local offices buy official US Powerball lottery tickets on your behalf from inside the US, and with theLotter’s See Your Ticket Service, you will see a scan of any and all Powerball tickets you buy in your theLotter account before the relevant draw.
The two different methods, both offer you, the player, the same user experience and the only difference is in the back end of how the online lottery ticket provider works. The two methods that online lottery sites use differ in one key way; They either have agents and employees all over the world that physically purchase tickets on behalf of clients or, the more recent phenomenon is when companies essentially take out an insurance policy on every ticket which is tied to the size of the jackpot. This is the difference between you playing the lottery online and betting on the lottery online*. In the latter option you are, de facto, not playing the US Powerball online but rather you are placing a bet with an insurance company on the outcome of the corresponding Powerball draw. 
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