Mega Millions (which began as The Big Game in 1996 and renamed, temporarily, to The Big Game Mega Millions six years later) is an American multi-jurisdictional lottery game; it is offered in 44 states, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The first (The Big Game) Mega Millions drawing was in 2002; see below. (What is now Mega Millions initially was offered in six states; the logo for all versions of the game following the retiring of The Big Game name featured a gold-colored ball with six stars to represent the game's initial membership.)
These lottery results are for personal use only, and are intended solely for the individual Web visitor displaying the content inside a Web browser.  Distribution, re-publication, or use in other Web sites in any manner, in full or in part, is strictly prohibited.  The use of automated software or technology to glean content or data from this or any page at Lottery Post for any reason is strictly prohibited.  Copyright © 2018 Lottery Post.
If you still have doubts as to whether you can buy lottery tickets online, check out the Iraqi national that won $6.4 million in the Oregon State lottery despite not being a) a citizen, b) a resident and c) having never set foot in Oregon (or even the US for that matter!). Click the link on the text to read more about this watershed moment in buying lottery tickets online and the unsuccessful steps taken by the local government to try and block this payment. Despite all the efforts, the lottery winner had acted completely legally and was entitled to his millions. 
On May 18, 2013, the world's largest one-ticket jackpot, an annuity of approximately $590.5 million ($620 million today), was won by a Powerball ticket sold in Zephyrhills, Florida.[33] On June 5, Florida Lottery officials announced the winner: Gloria C. MacKenzie, 84, who purchased the "quick pick" ticket at a Publix supermarket.[34] MacKenzie chose the cash option of approximately $370.8 million, before Federal withholding; Florida does not have a state income tax.[34]
The owner of the store that sold the ticket is incentivized to get the winnings to the right person as this is the only way they can receive their bonus for selling the winning tickets (They will not get paid until any disputes have been settled) – In the case of the Iraqi man winning the Oregon State lottery, the shop that sold the ticket received a $64,000 ‘selling bonus’.

Powerball® tickets print the white ball numbers in numerical order of a given play. You can match the white ball numbers in any order of a given play to win a prize. The red Powerball number of a given play on your ticket must match the red Powerball drawn. Each play on a ticket is separately determined; players cannot crisscross play lines on a ticket or combine numbers from other tickets. 
For many potential players, the viral story of the Iraqi lottery winner opened their eyes and showed a proof of concept that not only can you play the Powerball online, but more importantly, if you play and win, you will get paid. Without the concrete example of the Iraqi lotto winner, it would be hard to prove to anyone without a doubt that you will be eligible for the payment if you win. The US Powerball is even more clear cut as it specifically has no limitations or restrictions to who can buy Powerball tickets online. You can be sure that if you get Powerball tickets online and it is to play and not bet on the lottery that there will be a local agent buying your ticket for you. 
One funny story concerning the Powerball draw came in March, 2005 when 110 players matched all five winning numbers, minus the Powerball (22, 28, 32, 33 and 39). The Powerball lottery officials, who were understandably suspicious, paid out nearly $20 million. It soon came to light that a biscuit company from New York named Wonton Food had printed six numbers to go in their fortune cookies and these numbers really had proved to be lucky, as they were the five Powerball numbers, minus the Powerball! Unfortunately for the 110 players, they were just two off the Powerball number of 42, as the number 40 had been predicted in the fortune cookies.
Hot numbers are the lottery numbers that appear the most, and US Powerball's all-time hot numbers are 26, 16, 41, 32, and 28. Cold numbers are the numbers that appear infrequently. Some lotto fans choose them specifically because of this, believing that their reappearance in US Powerball results is only a matter of time, while others stay clear. The US Powerball lottery all-time cold numbers are 60, 65, 67, 68, and 66. We update Powerball’s hot and cold numbers listings every year to help you make your number selection.
Powerball® tickets print the white ball numbers in numerical order of a given play. You can match the white ball numbers in any order of a given play to win a prize. The red Powerball number of a given play on your ticket must match the red Powerball drawn. Each play on a ticket is separately determined; players cannot crisscross play lines on a ticket or combine numbers from other tickets. 
Jump up ^ Lotto, Lucy (June 30, 2011). "Powerball Lottery Changes for 2012". WorldLottery.net. Archived from the original on August 23, 2013. Retrieved September 4, 2013. The first and biggest change to the Powerball Lottery is the introduction of the $40 million base jackpot. Now, when the Powerball Lottery jackpot is reset after a win it will start at $40 million, tempting even more players in for those early draws. Another promise, that is sure to be popular with lottery players, is the introduction of more prizes. From January, Powerball players will have even better odds of winning a prize worth at least $1 million, and it’s that fact that may soften the third and biggest ever change. From January 15, 2012, Powerball Lottery tickets are doubling in price, in what is the biggest change to the Powerball Lottery draw since its launch in 1994.

When it was launched in 1992 Powerball became the first game to use two drums. Using two drums to draw numbers from offers more manipulation by simultaneously allowing high jackpot odds, numerous prize levels and low overall odds of winning (as explained later, a ticket can win by matching only one number). The two-drum concept was suggested by Steve Caputo of the Oregon Lottery. The two-drum concept has since been used by The Big Game (now Mega Millions) in the US, Australia's Powerball, Thunderball in the UK, Eurojackpot and EuroMillions (unlike most two-drum games, Euromillions selects two numbers called "Lucky Stars" from the 2nd drum; jackpot winners must make a total of seven matches).[citation needed]


Every jurisdiction has its own law on winners remaining anonymous. Some jurisdictions are required by law to provide the winner's name, city of residence, game won and prize amount to any third party that requests the information. Other jurisdictions allow winners to create trusts to shield their names from the public, or otherwise claim prizes anonymously. Check with your lottery to see if taking a photo of the winner is required and what its rules are on prize claims. Even if you keep your identity secret from the media and the public, you will have to be known to the lottery so officials can confirm you are eligible to play and win, as well as other legal requirements.


Once your lottery ticket is purchased, scanned and uploaded to your account, you own the ticket and the rights of the ticket – legally speaking what the agent has after scanning in your ticket is just a piece a paper. (This is why you should never trust a website that claims it is legitimate and does not following the insurance model but does not scan the tickets and send them to you – red flag).
×