Presumably due to their experience with the Power Play option for Powerball, all 23 lotteries joining Mega Millions on January 31, 2010 immediately offered Megaplier to their players. The Megaplier continues to be drawn by Texas Lottery computers, as California does not offer the multiplier. Montana, offering Powerball before the expansion date, became the 24th lottery to offer the Megaplier, followed by Nebraska (the 25th), Oregon (the 26th), Arizona (as the 27th) and Maine (as the 28th lottery to offer the Megaplier option). After Colorado and South Dakota joined Mega Millions, this raised the number of lotteries offering the Megaplier to 37.
Hot numbers are the lottery numbers that appear the most, and US Powerball's all-time hot numbers are 26, 16, 41, 32, and 28. Cold numbers are the numbers that appear infrequently. Some lotto fans choose them specifically because of this, believing that their reappearance in US Powerball results is only a matter of time, while others stay clear. The US Powerball lottery all-time cold numbers are 60, 65, 67, 68, and 66. We update Powerball’s hot and cold numbers listings every year to help you make your number selection.

The Iowa Lottery makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the winning numbers, prize payouts and other information posted on the Iowa Lottery website. The official winning numbers are those selected in the respective drawings and recorded under the observation of an independent accounting firm. In the event of a discrepancy, the official drawing results shall prevail. All names, logos and information contained within these pages are meant for personal use only and may not be reproduced or distributed without the expressed written consent of the Iowa Lottery. You must be at least 21 years old to purchase Iowa Lottery tickets. Please play responsibly. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, please call 1-800-BETSOFF for help.


PlayEuroLotto.com is licensed in the UK and in Curacao to provide lottery betting services. We uphold stringent data protection and security processes, we secure your prize money with industry-leading insurance cover, and we carry out thorough identity checks to prevent access by underage players and criminals. Everything we do is designed to safely deliver your fair chance of a life-changing win.<
Increased levels of lottery play have been linked with certain sections of the U.S. population — men, African-Americans, Native Americans, and those who live in disadvantaged neighborhoods, according to one 2011 study of over 5,000 people published in the Journal of Gambling Studies. (Susan Cartwright, a spokeswoman for Scientific Games SGMS, -6.54% which sells scratch cards, says a 2014 study by an independent research firm, Chadwick Martin Bailey, found that lottery players mirror the general public’s ethnicity, employment, and income.)
Bob Bolduc, founder of Pride Station & Stores, where the prize was actually purchased, said the multimillion-dollar winning ticket was sold at about 2:30 p.m. Wednesday. He said that in the past year the convenience store chain has sold a handful of winning tickets worth $1 million or more, and he suspects that will “resonate with a lot of lottery buyers.”
Jackpot winners have the choice of receiving their prize either in one single lump sum payment, or once a year with the annuity option (30 payments over 29 years). They have 60 days to decide which way they want to be paid. During these 60 days, a player who originally opted for the annuity payment is able to instead take the lump sum payment option. If they do not make a choice either way, after 60 days, the player will automatically receive their prize as an annuity.
Prizes must be claimed in the jurisdiction where the winning ticket was purchased. Players can generally claim a prize up to $600 at any licensed lottery retailer in the jurisdiction where they bought the ticket. Prizes over $600 can be claimed at some lottery offices, depending on the amount, and also at lottery headquarters. Please contact your lottery with any further questions.
Remember, the advertised Mega Millions jackpot is the annuity jackpot, which means it's the amount that you would receive if you were to opt for the money to be paid out over 29 annual payments (plus a one-off initial payment). For example, for an advertised jackpot of $200 million, the initial payment would be approximately $3 million, with future payments growing to as much as $12.4 million per annum. However, almost all jackpot winners take the cash option that is paid in one lump sum that, on average, is 60% of the advertised jackpot.
In 2013, US Powerball announced that it had a goal: to reach a $1 billion jackpot by 2022. The lottery has since passed the half a billion mark on four different occasions, and fans and players eagerly anticipated the grand rollover that would knock the others out of the top spots. As luck would have it, they only had to wait three years, not nine, to see their billion-dollar dreams come true. On 13 January 2016, the world's three luckiest ticket holders -- in Tennessee, California, and Florida -- shared the biggest jackpot ever in lottery history: $1.58 billion!

Jump up ^ Lotto, Lucy (June 30, 2011). "Powerball Lottery Changes for 2012". WorldLottery.net. Archived from the original on August 23, 2013. Retrieved September 4, 2013. The first and biggest change to the Powerball Lottery is the introduction of the $40 million base jackpot. Now, when the Powerball Lottery jackpot is reset after a win it will start at $40 million, tempting even more players in for those early draws. Another promise, that is sure to be popular with lottery players, is the introduction of more prizes. From January, Powerball players will have even better odds of winning a prize worth at least $1 million, and it’s that fact that may soften the third and biggest ever change. From January 15, 2012, Powerball Lottery tickets are doubling in price, in what is the biggest change to the Powerball Lottery draw since its launch in 1994.
The largest jackpot in Mega Millions history was $656 million annuity value (with a cash option of $474 million) for the March 30, 2012 drawing, in which there were three jackpot-winning tickets; one each in Illinois, Kansas, and Maryland. All three tickets had been claimed by April 18, with each set of winners choosing the cash option of $158 million.[6]
On June 2, 2010, Ohio won a Powerball jackpot; it became the first lottery selling either Mega Millions or Powerball (when 2010 began) to provide a jackpot-winning ticket for its newer game. The ticket was worth a $261 million annuity; it was sold in Sunbury. Ohio's second Powerball jackpot-winning ticket, sold for the June 23, 2010 drawing, was part of another first; since Montana also provided a jackpot winner for that drawing, it was the first time a jackpot was shared through lotteries which sold competing games before the cross-selling expansion, as Montana sold only Powerball before the expansion date.
Once your lottery ticket is purchased, scanned and uploaded to your account, you own the ticket and the rights of the ticket – legally speaking what the agent has after scanning in your ticket is just a piece a paper. (This is why you should never trust a website that claims it is legitimate and does not following the insurance model but does not scan the tickets and send them to you – red flag).
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