The final 5/56 + 1/46 Mega Millions drawing was held on October 18, 2013; that night's jackpot of $37 million was not won. The first drawing under the revised 5/75 + 1/15 format—which saw the jackpot estimate "leap" to $55 million due to the change in the annuity structure—occurred on October 22, 2013. The minimum jackpot was then $15 million, with rollovers of at least $5 million. Second prize (5+0) became $1 million cash. In the revised format, players chose 5 of 75 white ball numbers, and the "Gold Ball" number out of 15.

The odds of winning the Mega Millions jackpot are 1 in 302.6 million, making them the highest odds of any other state or multi-state lottery game ever played in the United States. However, this means the jackpot can grow to surpass the billion-dollar mark with relative ease. The overall odds of winning any prize are 1 in 24, which is slightly better than that of Powerball, which are 1 in 24.87.
Jump up ^ "Mega Millions jackpot reaches record $500 million". Komo News. Sinclair Interactive Media. March 28, 2012. Retrieved September 4, 2013. The jackpot was originally announced at $476 million early Wednesday morning but rampant ticket sales boosted the estimated payout to the $500 million mark. Tuesday night's jackpot was $363 million, fed by weeks of drawings without a top winner. It has rolled 18 times since Marcia Adams of College Park won $72 million in the Jan. 24 drawing. A winner could get $19.2 million a year for 26 years or a single payment of $359 million. The previous record jackpot in the Mega Millions game was $390 million in 2007, split by two winners in New Jersey and Georgia.
The world of the online lottery and buying online lottery tickets is only going to become more streamlined in the future. The interesting event around the corner will be just how State lottery organizers deal with the insurance method and the repercussions of this upcoming legal judgment. In the mean time, you can feel rest and assured that you can play the US Powerball online, you can win the US Powerball online and you will get paid your US Powerball jackpot winnings if you do win.
Earlier big Mega Millions winners at theLotter included Spanish player B.G. who won a $250,000 second place prize in the Mega Millions draw on 20 March 2012. A year earlier, N.B. traveled from his home in Switzerland to New York to collect his $250,000 Mega Millions prize after winning in the draw on 26 April 2011. And T.K. from New York was our first huge Mega Millions winner when he won $250,000 in October 2009. Will you be theLotter’s next big Mega Millions winner? Play online today and find out!
Drawings for Powerball are held every Wednesday and Saturday evening at 10:59 p.m. Eastern Time. Since October 7, 2015, the game has used a 5/69 (white balls) + 1/26 (Powerballs) matrix from which winning numbers are chosen, resulting in odds of 1 in 292,201,338 of winning a jackpot per play.[1] Each play costs $2, or $3 with the Power Play option. (Originally, Powerball plays cost $1; when PowerPlay began, such games were $2.) The official cutoff for ticket sales is 10:00 p.m. Eastern Time; some lotteries cut off sales earlier.[2] The drawings are usually held at the Florida Lottery’s studio in Tallahassee.
When it was launched in 1992 Powerball became the first game to use two drums. Using two drums to draw numbers from offers more manipulation by simultaneously allowing high jackpot odds, numerous prize levels and low overall odds of winning (as explained later, a ticket can win by matching only one number). The two-drum concept was suggested by Steve Caputo of the Oregon Lottery. The two-drum concept has since been used by The Big Game (now Mega Millions) in the US, Australia's Powerball, Thunderball in the UK, Eurojackpot and EuroMillions (unlike most two-drum games, Euromillions selects two numbers called "Lucky Stars" from the 2nd drum; jackpot winners must make a total of seven matches).[citation needed]
This method specifically has faced criticism recently from a number of lottery organizers such as Camelot, the UK National Lottery organizers who are not happy with companies “selling tickets” (selling bets on outcomes of their established lottery draws) for prices sometimes even cheaper than Camelot themselves sells their tickets. This legal and corporate dispute looks set to continue for the foreseeable future, in the mean time you can continue to buy Powerball tickets online, only now you are aware of the key differences between the two business models. 
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