Powerball is an American lottery game offered by 44 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands. It is coordinated by the Multi-State Lottery Association (MUSL), a nonprofit organization formed by an agreement with US lotteries. Powerball's minimum advertised jackpot is $40 million (annuity); Powerball's annuity is paid in 30 graduated installments or winners may choose a lump sum payment instead. One lump sum payment will be less than the total of the 30 annual payments because of the time value of money.
To play Lotto America, pick five main numbers between 1 and 52 and one Star Ball from a separate pool of 1 to 10. You can choose your own numbers or ask for a Quick Pick. It costs $1 per line to play, while you can also add the All Star Bonus to your ticket for a small additional fee for the chance to increase any non-jackpot prize. Find out more about how to play Lotto America, and then just pick up a playslip from any participating retailer to take part.
The minimum Powerball bet is $2. In each game, players select five numbers from a set of 69 white balls and one number from 26 red Powerballs; the red ball number can be the same as one of the white balls. The drawing order of the five white balls is irrelevant; all tickets show the white ball numbers in ascending order. Players cannot use the drawn Powerball to match two of their white numbers, or vice versa. Players can select their own numbers, or have the terminal pseudorandomly select the numbers (called "quick pick", "easy pick", etc.).
Before the January 31, 2010 cross-sell expansion, Mega Millions was the only multi-jurisdictional lottery whose drawings were carried nationally, instead of airing only on stations in participating jurisdictions. Chicago-based cable superstation WGN-TV simulcast Mega Millions drawings on its national WGN America feed immediately following WGN's 9pm (Central Time) newscast. Following the cross-sell expansion, WGN also began airing Powerball drawings nationally. WGN served as a default carrier of both major games where no local television station carried either multi-jurisdictional lottery's drawings. Both drawings were removed from WGN America in late 2014 when it ceased carrying WGN's newscasts.[39]
Jump up ^ "NEW YORK STATE GAMING COMMISSION AMENDMENT OF SECTIONS 5004.9, 5007.2, 5007.13, 5007.15, 5007.16, 5009.2 and 5010.2 OF NEW YORK CODES, RULES AND REGULATIONS TITLE 9, SUBTITLE T, CHAPTER III, SUBCHAPTER A" (PDF). New York State Gaming Commission. New York State Gaming Commission. p. 4. Archived from the original (PDF) on August 24, 2015. Retrieved 2015-08-02.

Through 2008, Powerball drawings usually were held at Screenscape Studios in West Des Moines, Iowa. The drawings' host was longtime Iowa radio personality Mike Pace, who had hosted MUSL drawings since Lotto America began in 1988. In 1996, Powerball went "on the road" for the first time, holding five remote drawings at the Summer Olympics in Atlanta. A few weeks later, Georgia became the only jurisdiction to leave Powerball (Maine, which joined MUSL in 1990, left when Powerball began). In August 1996, Georgia joined the then-new The Big Game, then the other major U.S. lottery group. It planned to sell tickets for both games for the rest of 1996; but within days Georgia was removed from MUSL, not to return until the 2010 cross-sell expansion.


Elecia Battle made national headlines in January 2004 when she claimed that she had lost the winning ticket in the December 30, 2003 Mega Millions drawing.[43] She then filed a lawsuit against the woman who had come forward with the ticket, Rebecca Jemison. Several days later, when confronted with contradictory evidence, she admitted that she had lied.[44] Battle was charged with filing a false police report the following day. As a result of this false report, she was fined $1,000, ordered to perform 50 hours of community service, and required to compensate the police and courts for various costs incurred.[45]
Due to falling sales of Hot Lotto (whose final drawing was October 28, 2017), a new version of Lotto America became available on November 12, 2017; its first drawing was November 15, 2017. Lotto America is available wherever Hot Lotto was offered at the time of its final drawing (except New Hampshire.) Lotto America is drawn on Wednesday and Saturday nights after 11 p.m. ET/10 p.m. CT. For each $1 play, bettors choose five numbers from 1 through 52, and a "star ball" numbered from 1 through 10, or ask for terminal-generated numbers. For an additional $1 per play, the bettor can add the "All-Star Bonus" option, which multiplies non-jackpot prizes by 2, 3, 4, or 5.[1][2][3][4] The minimum Lotto America jackpot is $2 million; however, the game's initial jackpot was $15 million; the 13 members chose to augment the jackpot with funds from Hot Lotto, whose final jackpot was not won.
Married children and children 21 years of age or older are not eligible to be included in your DV application. However, according to the Child Status Protection Act (CSPA), it may be possible for the child to immigrate with you if the DV application is made before the child turns 21 and the child turns 21 before visa issuance. In such cases, he/she may be protected from aging out and will be treated as if he/she were under 21 years solely for the purpose of processing the visa. However, in order to take advantage of this, the child actually must seek to acquire the immigrant visa within a year of the visa becoming available.

Assuming that you have chosen an online lottery company that physically purchases tickets online. How you play Powerball online is the following; Firstly, pick whether you want to buy group Powerball tickets online or single tickets. Almost all online lottery ticket providers offer the player to buy group tickets in addition to single ticket purchases. An online group game ticket in the Powerball is the same concept as a work syndication for the lottery, only nowadays thanks to the wonders of the internet, you don’t have to rely on the people in your vicinity – you can join a syndicate that is made up of hundreds, if not thousands of people scattered all across the globe. 

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